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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
by some demonstration, protesting the mohammed video, getting out of control. a lot of people in congress have said the mohammed video story was a cover-up. i actually hope for the good of the country that is true because at least it would demonstrate that the president understood reality. he was trying to sweep it aside. i'm worried that the ideology that controls the white house and presumably the state department which we're going to see four more years of, leaves us dangerously unprepared to meet the threats that we see from al qaeda, from other terrorist groups in the middle east and around the world. gregg: what do you think john kerry brings to the table? >> well, he certainly has a lot of experience, although a lot of it has been badly, bad judgment in a range of issues. he has been soft on the iranian nuclear weapons program. he has been soft on the north korean nuclear weapons program. he has been soft on russian desires to recreate russian hogeminy in the former soviet union. he has been soft on china's territorial demand in the south china sea. i could go on. i think he will f
fogood o ill and embodied what was important about the year. the magazine's list included mohamed morsi, tim cook and malala yousafzai, the pakistani teach ager shot for advocating girl's education. rick stengel joins me now. he's the managing editor of time. how do you go about selecting the person of the year. and in the end you decide. >> and in the end i decide. >> rose: don't you love privilege? >> (laughs) it weighs on your shoulders alwa time, as you know. probably beginning in the middle of the year we start thinking about it, a month or so later i start asking people like you, members of the "time" 100, our correspondents, editors, writers start sending in suggestions and have meetings and then we start talking about ideas, tloung out names, sometimes it's not a person but a group of people, like last year, the protest. the end we whittle it down to a short list and then we choose. >> what is it you that you measure them by? >> it's a historical thing, charlie. you measure them in part by past person of the year winners. i always like to feel the person who wins person of the y
been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the revolutions are going around the region. syria is teetering, georgia is burning, and the future is yet to be written. the question now is in all these countries will there be elections, will the islamists win? will it be one man, one vote or one-man, one-vote, one time. so with that we are going to debate the motion of democracy is the triumph in the middle east, it's up about box and is unavoidable and essential. we will have five minutes of opening remarks from each of our panelists today. we will start with ruel again to the good and go to brian and have q&a for myself as well as the audience and our panelists will be allowed to minutes at the end to restate their case and he essentially persuade you to believe what they believe. we will start now with ruel. ruel, you may begin. >> this is that such an angle. ruel, i'm confident you wi
mohamed morsi, a scene of shooting earlier today. but the focus tonight, rick, is a few miles away from where we are right now, the presidential palace. anti--morsi protesters out there in big time. they've been trying to knock down a barrier made of rock and steel separating them and the palace, all the while supporters of morsi are gathering not too far away also in big numbers. there was a deadly clash between those two sides just one week ago. the fear is this could happen again. the difference, however, between now and then is that morsi in the interim has endowed the military here with stronger powers. they can intervene, maybe break up some violence. now, all the while this is all focused on that draft constitution which is planned for a vote, a referendum on saturday. the critics of morsi say that he's trying to rush it through. they say it's discriminatory towards segments of the population here, and they also say that his own style over the last couple weeks reminiscent of one other strong man we've seen here in egypt, mubarak. for his part morsi and his supporters say they we
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)